Independent RP blog for the main character of an ongoing novel.
finite-infinite asked: She would’ve caught the eye of any wanderer at this time of night. She had the supple gait of a predator on the move; and a silhouette as lean and hungry as one whose interests lay in something more than simple sustenance. She was coming towards him; an insufferable bout of curiosity forced him to hold out an arm, catching her attention just before she passed him. The faulty lamplight shone down on his unkempt lengths of hair, his haggard appearance; he’d been wandering, too. “In a hurry?”

She tensed imperceptibly as he spoke, freezing solid in her pose before  in a slow, liquid motion turning just her head towards him. “Always.” Her tone was clipped, unemotional. There were things to be done- and yet, she couldn’t bring herself to merely brush this stranger off. Wasn’t she herself a leading example of the danger, the potential a powerless façade could conceal? There was something about this one…

To say that he was pleasantly surprised that she’d stopped in her tracks only for his sake would’ve been a euphemism. Too many people in this bizarre outside world were blocked behind their primal senses, their fear, their “flight or fight” instincts - especially females. And he would’ve understood them perhaps if he’d spent more time out here to witness the fruit of the modern man’s degradation. He was just tired of trying to connect with the lesser beings, the fearful, the sceptic. The simple fact that this woman held curiosity over fear told him that she was superior to the average London girl - and thus worth his attention, confirming his first impressions. 
He smiled at her response, taking in those sharp cheekbones and even sharper eyes that darted away from his as she continued on her way. Falling into step beside her and hoping she wouldn’t protest, Kairos continued his silent examination.
"Not a single hint of fear," he said, "Didn’t anyone tell you that you shouldn’t be so quick to trust strangers in the night?" He didn’t want to scare her off - he was only testing to see if that self-sufficient look was really founded. Something about her made him wonder for a split second if it was him that was being careless rather than her. But that was ridiculous - she was only a woman.
He spied a trinket that bumped against her bosom with every step - it glittered richly whenever it caught the lamplight, the style clearly Egyptian. “Especially if you’re not from here,” he ventured.    

Reblogged from theinfinitemind  905 notes
Self-worth.A man with a childhood such as his should’ve been plainly arrogant; should’ve seen every other living human who hadn’t lived in his conditions as an inferior being. For a child who was treated as nothing less than royalty, being the heart of an impossibly influential scientific fraternity, everyone expected him to be a rather high-maintenance specimen. But the sense of one’s own worth can’t be forced upon anyone; it’s something everyone must discover for themselves through even the cruellest means. For a long time, Kairos judged his own worth according to the high-ranking members of society that surrounded him, as he was encouraged to do. But such a contact is cold and formal; he might’ve been bred to believe that his soul was an almighty thing, but his heart was still human, and it would only accept judgement from a softer entity. Someone who struck a more intimate chord.And there is nothing more destructive than basing your self-worth on the opinion of the one you love.
The arrogant façade that Kairos hides behind only covers up a wealth of frustration, of inadequacy. Being pretentious is a way of convincing himself that he still has a high opinion of his being; he won’t admit to the same self-hatred as the patients that pass through his consultation room.
What would it take to satisfy her? The only thing that he couldn’t offer… normalcy.   

Self-worth.

A man with a childhood such as his should’ve been plainly arrogant; should’ve seen every other living human who hadn’t lived in his conditions as an inferior being. For a child who was treated as nothing less than royalty, being the heart of an impossibly influential scientific fraternity, everyone expected him to be a rather high-maintenance specimen. But the sense of one’s own worth can’t be forced upon anyone; it’s something everyone must discover for themselves through even the cruellest means.
For a long time, Kairos judged his own worth according to the high-ranking members of society that surrounded him, as he was encouraged to do. But such a contact is cold and formal; he might’ve been bred to believe that his soul was an almighty thing, but his heart was still human, and it would only accept judgement from a softer entity. Someone who struck a more intimate chord.
And there is nothing more destructive than basing your self-worth on the opinion of the one you love.

The arrogant façade that Kairos hides behind only covers up a wealth of frustration, of inadequacy. Being pretentious is a way of convincing himself that he still has a high opinion of his being; he won’t admit to the same self-hatred as the patients that pass through his consultation room.

What would it take to satisfy her?
The only thing that he couldn’t offer… normalcy.